You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation


Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation book. Happy reading You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation Pocket Guide.
Site Information Navigation

Can governments affect inequality? Which instruments should they use? It concludes that the transmission of bequests and human capital, entrepreneurship, and medical-expense risk are crucial. Why are some people wealthy while others are poor? To what extent can governments affect inequality?


  • Who Rules America: Wealth, Income, and Power.
  • WEREWOLF: To Dream Of Wolves - Part 1.
  • Spend Less, Live More.
  • When Pele Stirs: A Volcanic Tale of Hawaii, Hemp, and High-Jinks.

Answering these questions requires understanding why people save. The Trump administration is taking this idea to a new extreme: it has decided to let states create work requirements for Medicaid recipients, as if having healthcare could somehow deter work, as if only those who work deserve life.

After years spent feeling isolated and conflicted, Roberts decided to confront these issues. He became a national organizer for Resource Generation , a group aimed at helping rich young adults reduce inequality, partly by getting them to recognize how the wealthy can harm society.

6 studies on how money affects the mind

Unfortunately, rather than challenging inequality as it causes this stress, those at the top try to rationalize that they deserve what they have because they worked for it. But being excessively rewarded without putting in much effort may also cause problems. Topics Outclassed: the secret life of inequality.

Reuse this content. Order by newest oldest recommendations. Show 25 25 50 All. The price which society pays for the law of competition, like the price it pays for cheap comforts and luxuries, is also great; but the advantage of this law are also greater still, for it is to this law that we owe our wonderful material development, which brings improved conditions in its train. But, whether the law be benign or not, we must say of it, as we say of the change in the conditions of men to which we have referred: It is here; we cannot evade it; no substitutes for it have been found; and while the law may be sometimes hard for the individual, it is best for the race, because it insures the survival of the fittest in every department.

We accept and welcome therefore, as conditions to which we must accommodate ourselves, great inequality of environment, the concentration of business, industrial and commercial, in the hands of a few, and the law of competition between these, as being not only beneficial, but essential for the future progress of the race. Having accepted these, it follows that there must be great scope for the exercise of special ability in the merchant and in the manufacturer who has to conduct affairs upon a great scale.

The relationship between time, money, and happiness

That this talent for organization and management is rare among men is proved by the fact that it invariably secures for its possessor enormous rewards, no matter where or under what laws or conditions. The experienced in affairs always rate the MAN whose services can be obtained as a partner as not only the first consideration, but such as to render the question of his capital scarcely worth considering, for such men soon create capital; while, without the special talent required, capital soon takes wings.

Such men become interested in firms or corporations using millions; and estimating only simple interest to be made upon the capital invested, it is inevitable that their income must exceed their expenditures, and that they must accumulate wealth. Nor is there any middle ground which such men can occupy, because the great manufacturing or commercial concern which does not earn at least interest upon its capital soon becomes bankrupt.

It is a condition essential for its successful operation that it should be thus far profitable, and even that, in addition to interest on capital, it should make profit.

It is a law, as certain as any of the others named, that men possessed of this peculiar talent for affair, under the free play of economic forces, must, of necessity, soon be in receipt of more revenue than can be judiciously expended upon themselves; and this law is as beneficial for the race as the others. Objections to the foundations upon which society is based are not in order, because the condition of the race is better with these than it has been with any others which have been tried.

Of the effect of any new substitutes proposed we cannot be sure.

Highlights

The Socialist or Anarchist who seeks to overturn present conditions is to be regarded as attacking the foundation upon which civilization itself rests, for civilization took its start from the day that the capable, industrious workman said to his incompetent and lazy fellow, "If thou dost not sow, thou shalt not reap," and thus ended primitive Communism by separating the drones from the bees.

One who studies this subject will soon be brought face to face with the conclusion that upon the sacredness of property civilization itself depends--the right of the laborer to his hundred dollars in the savings bank, and equally the legal right of the millionaire to his millions. To these who propose to substitute Communism for this intense Individualism the answer, therefore, is: The race has tried that.

Site Index

All progress from that barbarous day to the present time has resulted from its displacement. Not evil, but good, has come to the race from the accumulation of wealth by those who have the ability and energy that produce it. But even if we admit for a moment that it might be better for the race to discard its present foundation, Individualism,—that it is a nobler ideal that man should labor, not for himself alone, but in and for a brotherhood of his fellows, and share with them all in common, realizing Swedenborg's idea of Heaven, where, as he says, the angels derive their happiness, not from laboring for self, but for each other,—even admit all this, and a sufficient answer is, This is not evolution, but revolution.

It necessitates the changing of human nature itself a work of eons, even if it were good to change it, which we cannot know. It is not practicable in our day or in our age. Even if desirable theoretically, it belongs to another and long-succeeding sociological stratum.

Our duty is with what is practicable now; with the next step possible in our day and generation. It is criminal to waste our energies in endeavoring to uproot, when all we can profitably or possibly accomplish is to bend the universal tree of humanity a little in the direction most favorable to the production of good fruit under existing circumstances. We might as well urge the destruction of the highest existing type of man because he failed to reach our ideal as favor the destruction of Individualism, Private Property, the Law of Accumulation of Wealth, and the Law of Competition; for these are the highest results of human experience, the soil in which society so far has produced the best fruit.

Unequally or unjustly, perhaps, as these laws sometimes operate, and imperfect as they appear to the Idealist, they are, nevertheless, like the highest type of man, the best and most valuable of all that humanity has yet accomplished. We start, then, with a condition of affairs under which the best interests of the race are promoted, but which inevitably gives wealth to the few.

Thus far, accepting conditions as they exist, the situation can be surveyed and pronounced good. The question then arises,—and, if the foregoing be correct, it is the only question with which we have to deal,—What is the proper mode of administering wealth after the laws upon which civilization is founded have thrown it into the hands of the few? And it is of this great question that I believe I offer the true solution. It will be understood that fortunes are here spoken of, not moderate sums saved by many years of effort, the returns on which are required for the comfortable maintenance and education of families.

This is not wealth, but only competence which it should be the aim of all to acquire. There are but three modes in which surplus wealth can be disposed of. Under the first and second modes most of the wealth of the world that has reached the few has hitherto been applied. Let us in turn consider each of these modes. The first is the most injudicious. In monarchical countries, the estates and the greatest portion of the wealth are left to the first son, that the vanity of the parent may be gratified by the thought that his name and title are to descend to succeeding generations unimpaired.

The condition of this class in Europe to-day teaches the futility of such hopes or ambitions. The successors have become impoverished through their follies or from the fall in the value of land. Even in Great Britain the strict law of entail has been found inadequate to maintain the status of an hereditary class. Its soil is rapidly passing into the hands of the stranger. Under republican institutions the division of property among the children is much fairer, but the question which forces itself upon thoughtful men in all lands is: Why should men leave great fortunes to their children?

If this is done from affection, is it not misguided affection?

Navigation menu

Observation teaches that, generally speaking, it is not well for the children that they should be so burdened. Neither is it well for the state. Beyond providing for the wife and daughters moderate sources of income, and very moderate allowances indeed, if any, for the sons, men may well hesitate, for it is no longer questionable that great sums bequeathed oftener work more for the injury than for the good of the recipients.

Wise men will soon conclude that, for the best interests of the members of their families and of the state, such bequests are an improper use of their means. It is not suggested that men who have failed to educate their sons to earn a livelihood shall cast them adrift in poverty. There are instances of millionaires' sons unspoiled by wealth, who, being rich, still perform great services in the community.

The Ten Commandments of Wealth Building

Such are the very salt of the earth, as valuable as, unfortunately, they are rare; still it is not the exception, but the rule, that men must regard, and, looking at the usual result of enormous sums conferred upon legatees, the thoughtful man must shortly say, "I would as soon leave to my son a curse as the almighty dollar," and admit to himself that it is not the welfare of the children, but family pride, which inspires these enormous legacies. As to the second mode, that of leaving wealth at death for public uses, it may be said that this is only a means for the disposal of wealth, provided a man is content to wait until he is dead before it becomes of much good in the world.

Knowledge of the results of legacies bequeathed is not calculated to inspire the brightest hopes of much posthumous good being accomplished. The cases are not few in which the real object sought by the testator is not attained, nor are they few in which his real wishes are thwarted. In many cases the bequests are so used as to become only monuments of his folly.

You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation
You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation
You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation
You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation
You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation
You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation
You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation
You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation
You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation

Related You Deserve to be Rich: Understanding and Utilizing the Science Behind Wealth Accumulation



Copyright 2019 - All Right Reserved